Calzephyr (calzephyr77) wrote in 1word1day,
Calzephyr
calzephyr77
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Wednesday Word: Falderal

Falderal - noun.

Sometimes spelled as folderol, this nonsense word appeared in the 1800s in the refrain of songs. It's similar to tra-la-la but can also mean a useless ornament, bauble or trifle.

Here are some examples:

Robert Bell made note of the usage in a Yorkshire mummer's play in his book Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of the Peasantry Of England of 1857: “I hope you’ll prove kind with your money and beer, / We shall come no more near you until the next year. /Fal de ral, lal de lal, etc.”

noted these words of an old Yorkshire mummer’s play in his Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of the Peasantry Of England of 1857:

In Sketches By Boz, Charles Dickens wrote, “Smuggins, after a considerable quantity of coughing by way of symphony, and a most facetious sniff or two, which afford general delight, sings a comic song, with a fal-de-ral — tol-de-ral."
Tags: f, noun, wordsmith: calzephyr77
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