Sally M (sallymn) wrote in 1word1day,
Sally M
sallymn
1word1day

Sunday Word: Fussbudget

fussbudget [fuhs-buhj-it]
noun:
one who fusses or is fussy especially about trifles; a needlessly fault-finding person.

Examples:

Hollywood stuffed and mounted the bluenose in the fussbudget fluttering of the character actress Margaret DuMont, dowager foil to a leering, slouching Groucho Marx, a battle-ax matron always shocked, ever harrumphing, to the vapors at the slightest scent of impropriety. (Thomas Doherty, Hollywood's Censor: Joseph I. Breen and the Production Code Administration)

Playing this classic busybody, Ullman merges the hauteur of those imperial snobs played by Maggie Smith with the fussbudget sputtering of a cartoon fowl. (Troy Patterson, A Bold New 'Howards End' Invites Viewers to Confront Their Illusions, The New Yorker, April 2018)

Call me a market fussbudget and grammar stickler, but 'will be' is not 'is'. (Lou Carlozo, So Far, Spartan Energy Stock Looks Like It’s on a Road to Nowhere , Investorplace, October 2020)

Origin:

1884, from fuss (n.) + budget (n.). One of several similar formulations around this time: Compare fussbox (1901); fusspot (1906). From 1960s associated with the character Lucy in the newspaper comic strip 'Peanuts.' (Online Etymology Dictionary)

From fuss + budget, from Middle English, from Old French bougette, diminutive of bouge (bag), from Latin bulga (bag). Ultimately from Indo-European root bhelgh- (to swell) that is also the source of bulge, bellows, billow, belly, and bolster. (Wordsmith.org)


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