Sally M (sallymn) wrote in 1word1day,
Sally M
sallymn
1word1day

Sunday Word: Epiphany

epiphany [ih-pif-uh-nee ]
noun:
1 capitalized : January 6 observed as a church festival in commemoration of the coming of the Magi as the first manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles or in the Eastern Church in commemoration of the baptism of Christ

2 an appearance or manifestation especially of a divine being

3a a usually sudden manifestation or perception of the essential nature or meaning of something
3b an intuitive grasp of reality through something (such as an event) usually simple and striking
3c an illuminating discovery, realization, or disclosure; a revealing scene or moment

Examples:

Invention has its own algorithm: genius, obsession, serendipity, and epiphany in some unknowable combination. (Malcolm Gladwell, In The Air, New Yorker, 2008)

But Scrooge's Christmas epiphany is interrupted by an aggro, mech-suit wearing time traveler (Veep's Sam Richardson) crashing through the wall to warn him about the apocalyptic Christmas in 3050. But Scrooge's Christmas epiphany is interrupted by an aggro, mech-suit wearing time traveler (Veep's Sam Richardson) crashing through the wall to warn him about the apocalyptic Christmas in 3050. (Jess Joho, The weirdest versions of 'A Christmas Carol', Mashable, 2019)

But after seeing Frank Stella’s wall reliefs in 1958, Woodman experienced an epiphany: that painting could spring out of the frame and assert itself in three dimensions. (Spinning craft into art at the Whitney Museum, Financial Times, 2019)

It was a grand farewell dinner, as he and Denisov were leaving to join their regiment after Epiphany. About twenty people were present, including Dolokhov and Denisov. (Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace)

Origin:

early 14c., 'festival of the manifestation of Christ to the gentiles' (celebrated Jan. 6; usually with a capital -E-), from Old French epiphanie, from Late Latin epiphania, neuter plural (taken as feminine singular), from late Greek epiphaneia 'manifestation, striking appearance, festival held in commemoration of the appearance of a god at some particular place' (in New Testament, 'advent or manifestation of Christ'), from epiphanes 'manifest, conspicuous,' from epiphainein 'to manifest, display, show off; come suddenly into view,' from epi 'on, to' (see epi-) + phainein 'to show' (from PIE root *bha- (1) 'to shine'). Of divine beings other than Christ, first recorded 1660s; general literary sense of 'any manifestation or revelation' appeared 1840, first in De Quincey. (Online Etymological Dictionary)

Middle English epiphanie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin epiphania, from Late Greek, plural, probably alteration of Greek epiphaneia 'appearance, manifestation', from epiphainein 'to manifest', from epi- + phainein 'to show' (Merriam-Webster>


Tags: e, greek, latin, middle english, noun, religion, wordsmith: sallymn
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