☆ (theidolhands) wrote in 1word1day,

theidolhands
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Saturday Word: Voluntold & Cryptid

I'm sorry I missed last week due to technical difficulties with my web browser. Therefore, I shall double your pleasure for today's vocabulary!


vol·un·told [vŏl'ən-tōld]:
origin: American (slang, possibly military); portmanteau of volunteer + told.

verb
A combination of "volunteer" + "told".

When one feels they must do something despite being told it is "voluntary" or has been volunteered by someone else without their knowledge or permission; past participle of voluntell. Essentially, mandatory volunteering is "work" masquerading as volunteering, generally resembling the latter only by a lack of payment for said goods or services.



Bondegezou (or Dingiso) has proven itself both real & adorable


cryp·tid [ˈkrɪp-tɪd]:
origin: Greek; κρύπτω = krypto= “hide”, as in hidden (or secret) animal.

noun
Cryptids are animals from cryptozoology, a category referred to as pseudo-science and deals with creatures that are believed to be non-existent or mythological, at the very least a lack of proof exists to prove their existence. Animals of interest to cryptozoologists can remain categorized as a "cryptid" even if now accepted by the scientific community as real.

For example, a myriad of human cultures speak of Dragons -- giant intelligent lizards or serpents -- sometimes said to be winged or fire breathing, but no bones of such an animal have ever been found, and we are assured that dinosaurs did not exist at the same time as mankind; it’s a curiosity. Indeed they may only live as myth, although the Kimodo Dragon has been given the title: an enormous monitor lizard with venomous saliva and a taste for human flesh.

Interestingly enough, there is a selection of animals that were thought not to exist for some time and have eventually proven themselves real, here are a few: Narwhal (spotted whale with a Unicorn horn), Giant Squid (turns out sailors weren't drunk or lying), Platypus (first taxidermy specimen was mocked as a fake), and the Oarfish explains some sightings of "sea serpents". The Ulama (or "Devil Bird" a giant owl) is technically on the cryptid list, but has recently been sighted and matches the descriptions of Sri Lanka natives down to the blood-curdling human scream that it chirps. Even "Nessie", Scotland's famous Loch Ness Monster, may have recently appeared on a satellite image!

However...Big Foot remains at large.
Tags: c, greek, noun, portmanteau, unknown etymology, v, verb, wordsmith: theidolhands
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  • Sunday Word: Merrythought

    merrythought [ mer-ee-thawt] adjective: (British English) the wishbone or furcula of a fowl, the forked bone between the neck and breast of a…

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