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cock·en·thrice [ˈkɒkˈɛnˈθraɪs]:
origin: (15th Century) Welsh Tudors, cock= bird, thrice= three

 photo f9ce28dd-a159-4c0f-866e-0fbee1a2a5f6_zpsea567833.jpg

noun
Dating back to the 15th century Welsh Tudor dynasty, chefs were inspired by mythical and mysterious animals, they decided to make a kind of Frankenstein monster roast by sewing the top of one animal to the bottom of another. Stuff it and roast it for that "thrice" surprise.

Bonus points for including unusual heads and feet, these ideas are being "brought to life" by Richard Fitch, who recreates meals described in historic cookery books; it was recently featured on Heston's Feasts as well. Feeling adventurous? Recipe found here!

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cor·tege [kɔrˈtɛʒ]:
origin: (1648) Latin cohort-, cohors= enclosure; eventually French cortège & Italian corteggiare.

noun
If you know how to use this word, it can be a sneaky way to insult someone, for while it's perfectly appropriate to use to describe a procession of people at a ceremony or wedding, it is most often used for the attendants necessary for a funeral; a retinue.
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Comments

( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
med_cat
Dec. 6th, 2013 10:04 am (UTC)
Very interesting words and I like the idea about using the connotative meaning of the second one...;)
theidolhands
Dec. 6th, 2013 10:09 pm (UTC)
Your word was inspired this week, another nice choice, and thank you for the comment.

med_cat
Dec. 7th, 2013 04:21 am (UTC)
My pleasure and thank _you_ for the compliment :)
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )

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