September 14th, 2021

Tulips::tip toe

Tuesday word: Hierarchy

Tuesday, Sep. 14, 2021

Hierarchy (noun)
hi·er·ar·chy [hahy-uh-rahr-kee, hahy-rahr-]


noun plural hi·er·ar·chies.
1. any system of persons or things ranked one above another.
2. government by ecclesiastical rulers.
3. the power or dominion of a hierarch.
4. an organized body of ecclesiastical officials in successive ranks or orders: the Roman Catholic hierarchy.
5. one of the three divisions of the angels, each made up of three orders, conceived as constituting a graded body.
6. Also called celestial hierarchy. the collective body of angels.
7. government by an elite group.
8. Linguistics. the system of levels according to which a language is organized, as phonemic, morphemic, syntactic, or semantic.

OTHER WORDS FROM HIERARCHY
an·ti·hi·er·ar·chy, noun, plural an·ti·hi·er·ar·chies, adjective

WORDS RELATED TO HIERARCHY
pecking order, ranking, position, pyramid, scale, grouping, echelons, chain of command, placing

See synonyms for: hierarchy / hierarchies on Thesaurus.com

HISTORICAL USAGE OF HIERARCHY
Hierarchy comes ultimately from Greek hierarchía “stewardship of sacred rites,” a derivative of hierárches “high priest, leader of sacred rites,” via Medieval Latin (h)ierarchia.
The Medieval Latin word originally meant “rank or dignity of a hierarch (high-ranking religious leader)” in a system devised in the late 5th or early 6th century by the mystical theologian and philosopher Pseudo-Dionysius. The Greek word hierarchía is formed from hierós “holy, dedicated to a god, sacred, strong, excellent, glorious” and a derivative of the verb árchein “to be first, begin, rule.”
The earliest occurrence of hierarchy in English dates from the late 14th century in the sense “one of the three divisions of the angels into higher and lower ranks.” This meaning was quickly extended to other supernatural entities, and finally, in the 16th century, to “rule or dominion in holy matters, rule or government by priests, a system of ecclesiastical rule.” The sense “a group of people, plants, animals, or things ranked in grades, orders, or classes” dates from the 17th century.

Origin: 1300–50; < Medieval Latin hierarchia < Late Greek hierarchía rule or power of the high priest, equivalent to hier- hier- + archía -archy; replacing Middle English jerarchie < Middle French ierarchie < Medieval Latin ierarchia, variant of hierarchia

HOW TO USE HIERARCHY IN A SENTENCE
However, if you begin to look carefully at sentences, what you find is that they are organized in this hierarchy.
TALKING IS THROWING FICTIONAL WORLDS AT ONE ANOTHER - ISSUE 89: THE DARK SIDE|KEVIN BERGER|SEPTEMBER 9, 2020|NAUTILUS

Forbes was generally a pretty platooned place, and there was a hierarchy and knowledge was exchanged very judiciously in the ranks.
‘UNSTOPPABLE INNOVATOR’: THE METEORIC RISE OF MEREDITH KOPIT LEVIEN, THE NEXT NEW YORK TIMES CEO|STEVEN PERLBERG|AUGUST 19, 2020|DIGIDAY

Usually, at some point below board level, someone in the hierarchy doesn’t have time to think purely about organic non-brand clicks.
WHY SEOS SHOULD CARE ABOUT BRAND|ROBIN LORD|JULY 31, 2020|SEARCH ENGINE LAND

Upfronts upendedAs the playing field levels between the TV companies and the streaming platforms, the hierarchy for upfront negotiations has the potential to be upended.
STREAMING ADVERTISING’S TIPPING POINT: VIEWERSHIP HAS SHIFTED AND AD DOLLARS ARE EXPECTED TO FOLLOW|TIM PETERSON|JULY 16, 2020|DIGIDAY