Teen Wolf::Sheriff S::bottle

Tuesday word: Solace

Tuesday, Jul. 27, 2021

Solace (noun, verb)
sol·ace [sol-is]


noun Also called sol·ace·ment.
1. comfort in sorrow, misfortune, or trouble; alleviation of distress or discomfort.
2. something that gives comfort, consolation, or relief: The minister's visit was the dying man's only solace.

verb (used with object)
3. to comfort, console, or cheer (a person, oneself, the heart, etc.).
4. to alleviate or relieve (sorrow, distress, etc.).

OTHER WORDS FROM SOLACE
sol·ac·er, noun
un·sol·aced, adjective
un·sol·ac·ing, adjective

WORDS RELATED TO SOLACE
pity, condolence, consolation, assuagement, relief, alleviation, mitigate, console, comfort, upraise, soften, soothe, cheer, alleviate, allay, buck up, condole with

See synonyms for: solace / solacer on Thesaurus.com

Origin: 1250–1300; Middle English solas < Old French < Latin solacium, equivalent to sol ( ari ) to comfort + -ac- adj. suffix + -ium -ium

HOW TO USE SOLACE IN A SENTENCE
As 2020 continues to be unrelenting, I try my best to find the rare crumb of solace where I can.
HOMEMADE, SEASONED BREADCRUMBS ADD CRUNCH AND FLAVOR TO PASTAS, VEGETABLES AND MORE|JESSE SZEWCZYK|OCTOBER 30, 2020|WASHINGTON POST

Perhaps more than therapy, writing also offered a kind of solace.
DANIEL MENAKER, AUTHOR AND CELEBRATED EDITOR AT THE NEW YORKER AND RANDOM HOUSE, DIES AT 79|HARRISON SMITH|OCTOBER 29, 2020|WASHINGTON POST

Understanding that we’re one form of a molecular configuration among a sea of molecules that’s reforming and disambiguating, and reforming constantly, gives solace when I consider death.
HOW PSILOCYBIN CAN SAVE THE ENVIRONMENT - ISSUE 90: SOMETHING GREEN|MARK MACNAMARA|SEPTEMBER 30, 2020|NAUTILUS

We are incredibly grateful that our plants offer that little bit of solace and joy via nature into the home.
ONLINE GARDEN SHOP BLOOMSCAPE RAISES $15M SERIES B, ACQUIRES PLANT CARE APP VERA|SARAH PEREZ|SEPTEMBER 30, 2020|TECHCRUNCH
words 6

Sunday Word: Saltings

saltings [sawlt-ings]

noun:
(British English) areas of low ground regularly inundated with salt water, often taken to include their halophyte vegetation; salt marshes

Examples:

I trail after them, noting as I go four egrets feeding across the saltings, wondering if they now share the heronry in the lee of Harlech Castle. (Jim Perrin, Red legs flash over the green strand, The Guardian, September 2017)

With a tidal range of up to five metres, millions of litres of water flood and ebb through its narrow entrance twice a day, creating massive areas of food-rich channels, mudflats and saltings for thousands of birds, fish and an increasing number of seals. (Elaine Hammond, High Sheriff of West Sussex explores Chichester Harbour and find out why it is so special, Chichester Observer, August 2020)

The village of Northton on the south of the island provides access to some of the most interestingly formed saltings in the Hebrides. The low-lying grasslands are frequently submerged at high tide and have been shaped into an incredible group of small islands partitioned by a network of gracefully meandering channels. (Jeremy Flint, 10 of the Most Epic Places to Visit in Northern Scotland, Fodors, July 2021)

        
(Stoke Saltings, Kent's Hoo Peninsula UK, click to enlarge)

Origin:

Derived from salt, from Old English sealtan, from Proto-Germanic salto- (Online Etymology Dictionary)

Teen Wolf::Derek::Hale House

Tuesday word: Criterion

Tuesday, July 20, 2021

Criterion (noun)
cri·te·ri·on [krahy-teer-ee-uhn]; plural cri·te·ri·a [-teer-ee-uh]


noun
a standard of judgment or criticism; a rule or principle for evaluating or testing something.

OTHER WORDS FROM CRITERION
cri·te·ri·al, adjective

WORDS RELATED TO CRITERION
touchstone, benchmark, principle, yardstick, precedent, norm, proof, foundation, scale, basis, pattern, original, canon, rule, standard, prototype, exemplar, measure, opinion, model

See synonyms for: criterion / criteria on Thesaurus.com

SYNONYMS
measure, touchstone, yardstick. See standard.

SYNONYM STUDY FOR CRITERION
See standard.

USAGE NOTE FOR CRITERION
Like some other nouns borrowed from the Greek, criterion has both a Greek plural, criteria, and a plural formed on the English pattern, criterions. The plural in -a occurs with far greater frequency than does the -s plural: These are the criteria for the selection of candidates. Although criteria is sometimes used as a singular, most often in speech and rather infrequently in edited prose, it continues strongly in use as a plural in standard English, with criterion as the singular.

Origin: First recorded in 1605–15; from Greek krit?rion “a standard,” equivalent to kri- variant stem of kri´nein “to separate, decide” + -terion neuter suffix of means (akin to Latin -torium -tory)

HOW TO USE CRITERION IN A SENTENCE
Not only that, he drew a polygon with the fewest possible sides that met these criteria.
CAN YOU CROSS LIKE A BOSS?|ZACH WISSNER-GROSS|FEBRUARY 12, 2021|FIVETHIRTYEIGHT

Employees who meet certain eligibility criteria could receive as much as 600 hours — 15 work weeks — of extra leave time to be paid from a $570 million fund that the bill would create.
FEDERAL WORKERS COULD GET MORE PAID LEAVE IF COVID-19 PREVENTS THEM FROM WORKING|ERIC YODER|FEBRUARY 10, 2021|WASHINGTON POST

Those criteria are the product of decades of field studies, through which scientists have amassed a vast reference dataset of fossil structures, against which researchers can compare and evaluate any new discoveries.
FOSSIL MIMICS MAY BE MORE COMMON IN ANCIENT ROCKS THAN ACTUAL FOSSILS|CAROLYN GRAMLING|FEBRUARY 9, 2021|SCIENCE NEWS

Data can help point us to places where policing practices look the most problematic by these criteria.
THE POLICE DEPARTMENTS WITH THE BIGGEST RACIAL DISPARITIES IN ARRESTS AND KILLINGS|SAMUEL SINYANGWE|FEBRUARY 4, 2021|FIVETHIRTYEIGHT
words 6

Sunday Word: Cerulean

cerulean [suh-roo-lee-uhn]

adjective:
resembling the blue of the sky; a shade of blue ranging between azure and a darker sky blue



Examples:

Ten thousand balloons drifted into the cerulean sky as Yoshinori Sakai jogged up the 163 steps leading into the stands of Japan National Stadium. (Rob Gilhooly, When Tokyo unveiled its modernity to the world at the 1964 Olympics, The Japan Times, July 2021)

More than 1.7 million people follow this feline on Instagram to stare into his slightly askew, cerulean eyes and see what costume his owners will dress him up in next. (Paula Froelich, 12 cool Instagram cats to follow on Caturday, New York Post, December 2019)

Far below, the sea is swirling with shades of blue. It’s as if someone has rinsed a paintbrush in it - kingfisher, periwinkle, cerulean and duck egg. (Angelina Villa-Clarke, Find your mojo in Mauritius, The Jewish Chronicle, July 2021)

I have discerned a matchless and indescribable light blue, such as watered or changeable silks and sword blades suggest, more cerulean than the sky itself, alternating with the original dark green on the opposite sides of the waves, which last appeared but muddy in comparison. (Henry David Thoreau, Walden & on the Duty of Civil Disobedience)

The street that they were following suddenly opened upon a wide avenue, and before them spread a broad and beautiful lagoon, the quiet surface of which mirrored the clear cerulean of the sky. (Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan the Untamed)

Origin:

'sky-colored, sky-blue,' 1660s, with -an + Latin caeruleus 'blue, dark blue, blue-green,' perhaps from a dissimilation of caelulum, diminutive of caelum 'heaven, sky,' which is of uncertain origin. The Latin word was applied by Roman authors to the sky, the Mediterranean, and occasionally to leaves or fields. The older adjective in English was ceruleous (1570s). As a noun, from 1756. The artist's cerulean blue is from 1885. (Online Etymology Dictionary)

Cerulean comes from the Latin word caeruleus, which means 'dark blue' and is most likely from caelum, the Latin word for 'sky.' An artist rendering a sky of blue in oils or watercolors might choose a tube of cerulean blue pigment. Birdwatchers in the eastern U.S. might look skyward and see a cerulean warbler (Dendroica cerulea). 'Cerulean' is not the only color name that's closely associated with the sky. 'Azure' (which ultimately comes from a Persian word for lapis lazuli, a rich blue stone) describes the color of a cloudless sky and can even be a noun meaning 'the unclouded sky.' (Merriam-Webster)

words

Wednesday Word: Peloton

Peloton - noun.

Every now and then a word becomes a brand name, as in the case of everyone's favourite pandemic bike, Peloton. I only discovered that Peloton was a real word during the recent Tour de France crash.

Peloton comes to us from the French word for platoon. Nowadays it refers to a main pack of riders in a bicycle race. It might intrigue you to know that pelotons are not just strategic--riding in a pack creates a reduction in drag and allows cyclists to save energy. Huh!


TourDeFrance 2005-07-08.JPG
Public Domain, Link


NSYNC::fan for life

Tuesday word: Proficient

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Proficient (adjective, noun)
pro·fi·cient [pruh-fish-uhnt]


adjective
1. well-advanced or competent in any art, science, or subject; skilled: a proficient swimmer.

noun
2. an expert.

OTHER WORDS FROM PROFICIENT
pro·fi·cient·ly, adverb
pro·fi·cient·ness, noun
o·ver·pro·fi·cient, adjective
o·ver·pro·fi·cient·ly, adverb

WORDS RELATED TO PROFICIENT
capable, experienced, talented, versed, efficient, gifted, apt, conversant, adept, accomplished, skillful, qualified, trained, competent, clever, consummate, crack, crackerjack, effective, effectual

See synonyms for: proficient / proficients on Thesaurus.com
OTHER WORDS FOR PROFICIENT
1. adept, competent, experienced, accomplished, able, finished.

OPPOSITES FOR PROFICIENT
1. unskilled, inept.

Origin: 1580–90; < Latin proficient- (stem of proficiens ) present participle of proficere to advance, make progress, equivalent to pro- pro-1 + -ficere, combining form of facere to make, do1 . See -ent, efficient

HOW TO USE PROFICIENT IN A SENTENCE
For reading, 37 percent of students ranked proficient or advanced, with 24 percent at least proficient in math.
‘NATION’S REPORT CARD’ SHOWS DECLINES FOR LOWEST-PERFORMING STUDENTS|LAURA MECKLER|OCTOBER 28, 2020|WASHINGTON POST

Similarly, researchers have demonstrated that the deep networks most proficient at classifying speech, music and simulated scents have architectures that seem to parallel the brain’s auditory and olfactory systems.
DEEP NEURAL NETWORKS HELP TO EXPLAIN LIVING BRAINS|ANIL ANANTHASWAMY|OCTOBER 28, 2020|QUANTA MAGAZINE

“Areas with the lowest turnout, which were largely poor and frequently not always English proficient … also have extremely low rates of mail-in ballot applications,” Schmidt said.
PENNSYLVANIA’S NEW VOTE-BY-MAIL LAW EXPANDS ACCESS FOR EVERYONE EXCEPT THE POOR|BY JONATHAN LAI, SAMANTHA MELAMED AND MICHAELLE BOND, THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER|OCTOBER 22, 2020|PROPUBLICA

English-learners are students with a different home language, who are not yet proficient in English.
THE LEARNING CURVE: DISTANCE LEARNING POSES MORE CHALLENGES FOR ENGLISH-LEARNERS|WILL HUNTSBERRY|OCTOBER 8, 2020|VOICE OF SAN DIEGO
words 6

Sunday Word: Exegesis

exegesis [ek-si-jee-sis]

noun:
critical explanation or interpretation of a text or portion of a text; explication, especially of biblical and other religious texts

Examples:

This approach resulted in a more freeform 'rambling philosophical inquiry' rather than 'cinematic exegesis,' according to a statement. (Althea Legaspi, Sufjan Stevens, Angelo De Augustine Preview LP With Two New Songs , Rolling Stone, July 2021)

In addition to writing the play, I wrote an exegesis exploring the research that informed it, and the process of creative development. In the end, the exegesis was about twice the length of the play itself. (Paul Andrews, Phillip Kavanagh, Australian Stage, June 2012)

When I remembered the deliberate and impertinent moralizing of Thackeray, the clumsy exegesis of George Eliot, the knowing nods and winks of Charles Reade, the stage-carpentering and limelighting of Dickens, even the fine and important analysis of Hawthorne, it was with a joyful astonishment that I realized the great art of Tourguenief. (William Dean Howells, My Literary Passions)

A learned exegesis of the theology of the Sistine ceiling, Wind's volume on Michelangelo is also an extensive discussion of the intellectual milieu in which the artist was formed. (Edgar Wind, 'The Religious Symbolism of Michelangelo: The Sistine Ceiling', Renaissance Quarterly, June 2003)

Origin:

1610s, 'explanatory note,' from Greek exegesis 'explanation, interpretation,' from exegeisthai 'explain, interpret,' from ex 'out' + hegeisthai 'to lead, guide,' from PIE root sag- 'to track down, seek out'. Meaning 'exposition (of Scripture)' is from 1823. (Online Etymology Dictionary)

Theological scholars have long been preoccupied with interpreting the meanings of various passages in the Bible. In fact, because of the sacred status of the Bible in both Judaism and Christianity, biblical interpretation has played a crucial role in both of those religions throughout their histories. English speakers have used the word exegesis - a descendant of the Greek term exegeisthai, meaning 'to explain' or 'to interpret' - to refer to explanations of Scripture since the early 17th century. Nowadays, however, academic writers interpret all sorts of texts, and exegesis is no longer associated mainly with the Bible. (Merriam-Webster)

Hawaii::Nuuanu Pali Lookout

Tuesday word: Bourgeois

Tuesday, July 6, 2021

Bourgeois (noun, adjective)
bour·geois [boor-zhwah, boor-zhwah; French boor-zhwa]


noun plural bour·geois
1. a member of the middle class.
2. a person whose political, economic, and social opinions are believed to be determined mainly by concern for property values and conventional respectability.
3. a shopkeeper or merchant.

adjective
4. belonging to, characteristic of, or consisting of the middle class.
5. conventional; middle-class.
6. dominated or characterized by materialistic pursuits or concerns.

WORDS RELATED TO BOURGEOIS
materialistic, conservative, common, conventional, illiberal, middle-class, traditional, hidebound, old-line

See synonyms for bourgeois on Thesaurus.com

Origin: 1555–65; < Middle French; Old French borgeis burgess

HOW TO USE BOURGEOIS IN A SENTENCE
This book is nearly encyclopedic in its accounting of the pleasures of modern bourgeois American life.
LEAVE THE WORLD BEHIND’S BOUGIE APOCALYPSE|CONSTANCE GRADY|JUNE 11, 2021|VOX

Bourgeois said that the actions taken to limit the reach of the term “Stop the Steal” in the election’s immediate aftermath were temporary.
FACEBOOK’S SANDBERG DEFLECTED BLAME FOR CAPITOL RIOT, BUT NEW EVIDENCE SHOWS HOW PLATFORM PLAYED ROLE|ELIZABETH DWOSKIN|JANUARY 13, 2021|WASHINGTON POST

Renoir, Matisse, Picasso and Cézanne were considered formalistic and bourgeois artists.
IRINA ANTONOVA, GRANDE DAME OF RUSSIAN CULTURAL LIFE, DIES AT 98|EMILY LANGER|DECEMBER 4, 2020|WASHINGTON POST

At the same time, he was drawn to the work of future Nobel laureate André Gide, who rebelled against bourgeois conventions and wrote of sensual fulfillment.
DANIEL CORDIER, FRENCH RESISTANCE HERO, DIES AT 100|PHIL DAVISON|NOVEMBER 23, 2020|WASHINGTON POST